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THE EXPERTS
Walker Law Professional Corporation

Walker Law Professional Corporation

As a result of the large number of new housing and condominium projects, many Ontarions are taking advantage of the opportunity to purchase a newly-built home.

If you are undergoing home renovations with a contractor or you are a contractor, you should note that effective October 1, 2019, several provisions under the construction law which is called the Construction Act (the “Act”) will come into force and will fundamentally change how contractors request payment from property owners.

Many people are surprised at the conclusion of their lawsuit when they receive a bill from their lawyer that is much higher than they expected. If you receive a bill from your lawyer that you believe is unfair, there is a process in place to address your concerns called an assessment hearing.

In February 2019, the Canadian Centre for Diversity and Inclusion published a report addressing the important role senior management and leaders play in promoting diversity and inclusion.

When many people start a lawsuit, the end goal is getting to trial and obtaining a judgment against the other party. However, what many litigants do not consider is that a judgment is only a piece of paper.

According to the Toronto Real Estate Board, the average price of a condominium apartment in Toronto was $558,728 in Q4 2018. This is a sizeable investment. The first few years of condo ownership are critical. If you fail to address and acknowledge issues in your building and in your condo unit, your property investment can suffer.

The new year brings with it exciting changes and new laws. Here are two changes to the law that you should be aware of as you ring in 2019.

On June 7, 2018, the Ontario Progressive Conservatives were elected. Since that day, the provincial government has been moving swiftly to pass and amend laws. 

On October 17, 2018, the Federal Cannabis Act, 2018, and the Ontario Cannabis Act, 2018 became law in Ontario (“the Acts”). The Acts legalize the consumption of recreational cannabis in Canada.

Ontarians are spending vast sums of money renovating and repairing their residential properties. A 2017 report published by the Altus Group indicates that Ontarians spent $24.1 billion on alterations, improvements and conversions while an additional $7.5 billion was spent on repairs. Behind each repair and renovation is a contractor.

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